Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Trying to catch up!

Well it’s been a while but I hope I’ll up to posting a little more often considering the rash of big news that’s broken recently. I’ve had some issues with holidays both mine and people who’s work I have to cover, summer apathy and a sore paw in the form of carpal tunnel that is making several fingers twitch uncontrollably and makes my wrist ache.

I got a couple of letters and facebook notes about my Independence day post but was rather disappointed that I did not attract greater attention or at least a little flame war to liven things up a bit, oh well, next year I’ll be blunter;)


First off I’ll take care of the blog accounting and gloating, not only did my prediction from last Nov of $140 a barrel come true but now that both investment bank Bear Stearns and commercial bank IndyMac have taken the big dirt nap , I can with no reservations say I’ve met that prediction as well. Of course I don’t expect that to be the end of the financial bloodshed for this calendar year.


So what’s next?


As I see it we are assured more bank failures this year and probably a greater number next year. The FDIC which has over 90 banks on its watch list says that 8 banks including IndyMac have failed this year. While both of these numbers are low compared to the tally after the S&L Crisis, the FDIC will be forced to use nearly 20% of it’s $53 Billion insurance fund just on the IndyMac failure. How long before they are maxed out and the Government is left with the job of bailing out the FDIC itself? It's interesting to note that some insiders are saying IndyMac was either not on the watch list or only added just late month, too late to help, so how indepth or accurate is this "watch list" ? I doubt FDIC has had enough staff or time to check a fraction of the banks so expect the endangered list to grow significantly, and more banks not listed to fail.

While I admit that most troubled banks will be considerably smaller than IndyMac, after seeing Wachovia ( $ 8.9 Billion) and WaMu ( $ 3.3Billion) post such huge losses this weak I have proof that the crisis is not over and that it is not just the little guys who are in danger of collapse. A mess of small banks and one or two more IndyMac size and the FDIC will be out of funds, and guess who will bail them out?

THE BIG BAIL

It looks like the legislation to authorize the Treasury Department's right to bail out of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is a done deal. While they both claim they don't need a cash infusion I suspect that once the discount window is opened to them they will both be there in line, money bags open. The new legislation also raises the max mortgage size these crippled twins can purchase to 625k or median price +15%. This will allow the banks to pass off more of their bad loans to Fannie and Freddie while putting the feds on the hook for bad mortgages rather than the stupid ass banks that sold them. This could be nothing but will more likely lead to the U.S. picking up most of the bill for the housing collapse while the banks get off easy. However tjhis goes we can be guaranteed that it will cost the public more than the nothing the two lenders claim they need.


SEC to the rescue!!!


I think the biggest joke is the new proposals to stop short selling against the financials! Why should we protect the financials who have been so involved in the destruction of other equities through their manipulations such as the naked short. If the SEC is to curtail short selling it has to be done industry wide or not at all. No one sector should have a mechanism to make money and destroy others unless they too face the same risk. This is just a poorly hidden way to remove the value from your commodity stocks and transfer that wealth to the frauds, cheats and idiots that run rampant in the financial sector. Screw them all and let the banks fail, the sooner we get this collapse over with the sooner we can get on with rebuilding a new monetary system hopefully built on real money.


On the Canadian front,


BoC held interest rates rather than cutting – Good

The U.S. collapse is going to cost us jobs regardless, there is no point devaluing to keep customers who might never pay you. A higher CND will allow us to miss some of the coming wave of inflation and maintain the value of our savings better, I think it is worth losing jobs that peak oil would kill anyway , to keep our currency strong !


0% down mortgages and 40 terms are no longer allowed – Good

Too damn late but at least the next wave of idiots won’t have the option of 0% down and a 40 year term. We have been lucky that this kind of mortgage has not penetrated that deep inot our market and now thankfully people can only be 5% down 35 years stupid .

I still think 35 years is too long ; people graduate, get a job and buy a house usually by late 20s putting them just years from retirement when a 35 year mortgage is paid, that and the years of extra interest will mean less retirement savings.



Job losses in manufacturing, especially automotive are rising weakly- bad/good

bad for the economy but good for the environment and long term oil supplies as people are actually driving less -3% so far, and sales of the biggest, thirstiest vehicles are falling like buffalo chased of a cliff. For those people who actually need a large truck for business there are some amazing deals as the resale on these energy hogs plummets.


PMs

The metals are heading down again on bogus strong dollar talk from the U.S. and I’d be buying if I had not just purchased a car recently, Buy if you can.

I’m extremely annoyed and there is absolutely no excuse for what is happening to some of the junior miners, its nothing but deliberate manipulation, sabotage or institutional desperation to raise cash , take Silver Corp (SVM-T) for example; healthy, expanding, profitable, low cost and it has lost over 55% of its value of late without a single bit of bad news to justify it. This is all taken place during an aggressive stock buyback which apparently is having no effect on the price. Today for example every few minutes anonymous sells 500 shares maintaining or lowering the price, sure silver is slipping but zinc is steady and lead is up recently so how the hell can this profitable unhedged company that produces silver at a negative price, lose 8% today.


Golden Tag (GOG-t) is down 10% today! , while still a speculation play they’ve earned the right to 50% of the ECU San Diego mine which is a proven 42 million ounces of silver and growing, Market cap today $11 million. See Bob Moriarty's write up on GOG
This share price does do justice to their 21 million ounce stake in the San Diego mine and especially not on the recent news from the Aquilon project where they hit 376 ounces/ton of gold on a very narrow surface vein. While this might never be a full sized mine if there is any decent length or dept to this vein a small artisan style mine would make a nice profit for them, hell they could buy back 1/3 of their stock with a 10 ton “bulk sample” WTF????
And why are they not doing this???


The stories go on and on and it makes no sense the prices for many of these juniors are lower than they were with $600 gold/ $12 silver (mind you some are crap and deserve a low share price but not many I follow don't deserve this fate). Is someone trying to destroy their viability and their ability to raise capital so the big boys can snap them up for pennies on the dollar? I don’t know what’s going on but this silliness makes you waver between selling the house and taking a 5 % stake in a company like GOG or selling all equities and running from the market. If I won the lottery tonight I’d make a bid for controlling stake tomorrow because deep down I know that fiat money is dying and real hard assests are the only choice, but man it's hard when you see the corruption and manipulaiton and you know your being screwed.

On the topic of manipulation Jim Sinclair apparently has about 60 juniors looking at the Chamber of Mines idea and hopefully we will get some action on outing the short sellers.

Well my paw is sore again so this is all the rant you’ll get from me today, I know I missed stuff but what can you do, I'll be back when I can

3 comments:

nitroglycol said...

Interesting analysis. I don't know enough to assess what you have to say about those mining stocks, but the stuff I do understand sounds pretty much spot on to me.

By the way, did you notice this article?

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080723.wrcurrency0723/EmailBNStory/Business/home

I find it particularly noteworthy that the article talks about places like Qatar and Egypt, but doesn't mention Saudi Arabia once. I guess the prospect of the Saudis unpegging their currency is a bit too scary for the folks at the Globe.

Canadian silver bug said...

Yes I did see this I was just too sore to touch every topic

I agree its too scary but for the time being the Saudis have made promises to the U.S. to hold the peg for now. Is this a promiss to trust I don't know but the globe is probably right this once that there are other countries more likely in the short term than the Sauds to cut the peg.

This is one area my predictions are missing, I expected U.S. pegs to drop much sooner than might be realistic in both the oil states and central america. I still believe Panama, Ecuador and a few others will create their onw or a regional currency soon to escape the comming U.S. dollar destruction.

I was suprised the Globe even touched the topic, the fact the idea is getting that mainstream proves somethings comming.

The most bizzare currency story of late is Germans refusing to accept Euros issued by Latin bloc countries which might foreshadow German sentiment to go back to an independant currency, which will certainly rock the EU.

nitroglycol said...

Yeah, that story about the Euros in Germany was weird, wasn't it?

Regarding Saudi Arabia, I have to wonder about the continued stability of their government. If they don't unpeg, the population will suffer more as inflation accelerates; this could conceivably lead to the overthrow of the House of Saud, in which case all bets are off.